Irons & Steamers

Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display

Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display
Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display

Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display

Known as a box iron, this contains a slug' which was heated on the range then placed inside the iron. Such irons were preferred by the housekeeping staff of english country houses (as in downton abbey) to ensure clothes remained spotlessly clean during pressing. The more common flat iron' was placed directly on the fire resulting in soot or charcoal leaving marks on the freshly laundered items. One can pity the poor housemaid who was tasked with the job - this box iron weighs over 7 pounds (3.5kg). The solid iron slug' accounts for half the weight despite its relatively modest size (see photo 6).

The transport costs could be reduced by circa 40% if you don't want the slug insert, although it does complete the box iron and looks very impressive on display. They are also becoming increasingly difficult to find nowadays apart from in a museum. A crane lifts the rear door to accommodate the slug (photo 7) and lowered once it's in place. There were no health & safety laws in early victorian england so do exercise caution. Measures 7.5 tall and 7 long.

The widest side is 4. Or 19 x 18 x 10 centimetres.

Fully insured against loss or damage. This item is made of wood and english iron, cast iron.


Early Victorian BOX IRON and SLUG for Pressing Clothes 19th century Laundry Appliance Downton Abbey Housekeeping Antique Shop Display